One change for lowering your weight

If I could encourage people to do one thing to to lose weight it would be drink fewer sugary beverages! 

I’m providing a link to explain the health risks of drinking a lot of sugary drinks, but am only going to blog about how reducing sugary drinks can aid weight management.

When focusing on weight loss, if there is one easy way to support weight loss, it’s drink more water and fewer sugary drinks. It’s that simple. Of course, not everybody who’s overweight drinks a lot of sugary drinks. This advice isn’t going to apply to those who don’t, but if you habitually gulp down soda, juices, sports drinks, designer coffee beverages and smoothies, it will make a big difference for you.

You might be reading this and thinking juices and smoothies are good choices. Think again; juice and smoothies are presented to us as a “healthy choice” but don’t be fooled into thinking they support weight loss. They are a hidden source of a lot of calories and easier to overindulge than solid foods.

I’d like to reveal how switching from soda to juice is not wise from a weight loss standpoint or even an effective way to improve your health.

Let’s say you traded grape juice for soda because it’s healthier for you and you think you know that by looking at the bottle. Did you know that 8 oz of grape juice has about the same calories as 12 oz of soda?

Calories count, don’t think they don’t. While it’s important that your calories are coming from foods that are nutritious, don’t underestimate the affect of calories on body weight.

No sugar added! 2 servings of fruit! 100% Grape Juice  

That’s all good, right?

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And there’s more goodness on the back!”

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100% Grape Juice and heart healthy

The important part of the juice story is on the nutrition facts. 36 grams of sugar and 140 calories per 8 oz. serving.

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140 calories isn’t a lot, but then, neither is an 8 oz. serving. It’s half of a glass which means most people pour double that every time. If you drink juice several times a day, that’s a lot of calories.

Claiming it’s the equivalent of two servings of fruit for every 8 oz is misleading because in addition to the fiber and other benefits we get from fruit, it’s not as filling. In fact, the fiber in whole fruits helps to keep blood sugar levels from spiking, but there is no such protection when drinking fruit juice.

Research also suggests that liquid calories don’t provide the same satisfaction and lasting feeling of fullness we get from eating solid foods. In other words a banana which has about 120 calories will keep you feeling full longer than an 8 oz serving of a sugary drink at around 140 calories or 12 oz of soda.

If you drink one or more sugary drinks daily, pay attention. Cutting out your sugary drinks by switching to water can be a easy change to make to get your weight under control.

Jackie Conn

About Jackie Conn

Jackie Conn is married and has four grown daughters and four grandchildren. She is a Weight Watchers success story. She's a weight loss expert with 25 years of experience guiding women and men to their weight-related goals. Her articles on weight management have been published in health, family and women's magazines. She has been a regular guest on Channel 5 WABI news, FOX network morning program Good Day Maine and 207 on WCSH.