I Am All About That Bass

Meghan Trainor’s All About that Bass is about self-acceptance. I’m all about that.

Meghan Trainor’s self-acceptance message in All About the Bass is based on how her body is perceived by the boys. I’m not all about that. My problem with “her positive self image” and song about her perfect body is because she needs validation from the boys.

This blog is a bit of a revisit of an earlier blog. I think it’s important that I make it clear that I’m all for self-acceptance and a women’s right to flaunt her sexuality if she wants to. I’m not a proponent of determining self-value by how we’re perceived by others.

“Yeah it’s pretty clear, I ain’t no size two
But I can shake it, shake it like I’m supposed to do
‘Cause I got that boom boom that all the boys chase
All the right junk in all the right places
I see the magazines working that Photoshop
We know that shit ain’t real
Come on now, make it stop
If you got beauty beauty just raise ’em up
‘Cause every inch of you is perfect
From the bottom to the top
Yeah, my momma she told me don’t worry about your size
She says, boys they like a little more booty to hold at night
You know I won’t be no stick-figure, silicone Barbie doll,
So, if that’s what’s you’re into
Then go ahead and move along”

Read more: Meghan Trainor – All About That Bass Lyrics | MetroLyrics

What if she didn’t get that validation. What if the boys didn’t chase her boom boom? What if they said her junk was “just junky,” and no matter where your junk is placed, it’s never going to be “the right place?” Would she still have the same positive feeling about her big, bass body? I hope so. She should! The problem is that the lyrics in the song leave me wondering.

I have all the right junk in all the right places - and if the boys disagree that's their loss!"

I have all the right junk in all the right places – and if the boys disagree that’s their loss!”

The “skinny bitch” line confuses me too.

Go ahead and tell them skinny bitches Hey
No, I’m just playing I know you think you’re fat,
But I’m here to tell you that,
Every inch of you is perfect from the bottom to the top
Yeah, my momma she told me don’t worry about your size
She says, boys they like a little more booty to hold at night
You know I won’t be no stick-figure, silicone Barbie doll,”

She’s not skinny shaming even though “skinny bitches” may not be the nicest way to address thin women. She is telling them to stop thinking they’re fat – nothing wrong with that. Then she tells them “they’re perfect just the way they are,” and then negates that message with the horrible advice she got from her momma!

“Yeah, my momma she told me don’t worry about your size
She says, boys they like a little more booty to hold at night”

That’s why I don’t agree with those who say her song is such a good message for positive body image. I think it’s messed up.

I love that she wants to shake it, shake it, and I love that the boys love her boom boom. I just want to hear her sing that she shakes it because she loves it and it doesn’t matter who loves it too, as long as it pleases her!????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

A healthy body-image starts and ends with the owner of the body. If other people agree it’s a great body, that’s excellent! If they don’t, who cares?

Jackie Conn

About Jackie Conn

Jackie Conn is married and has four grown daughters and four grandchildren. She is a Weight Watchers success story. She's a weight loss expert with 25 years of experience guiding women and men to their weight-related goals. Her articles on weight management have been published in health, family and women's magazines. She has been a regular guest on Channel 5 WABI news, FOX network morning program Good Day Maine and 207 on WCSH.